This Adventurous Age

Adventures travelling and working around Australia.

2009 Travels July 1

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WEDNESDAY 1 JULY     TAYLORS BEACH

In the morning, John got involved in trying to use his Access program to make bowls records.

I wrote up the diary, read, sewed, walked around the caravan park – that did not take long. Disappointingly, from this park, the only walking options seem to involve walking around the streets of the settlement – and not on footpaths either, just on the road edge or on nature strips.

Had an early lunch and then set off for some serious tourist adventures – hopefully.

As we got to Halifax, John decided we must stop at a fishing tackle shop he saw, so he could have a browse in same. I waited in Truck. He came back with a prawn peeling device that looked like it might just work.

Just out of Halifax, saw a cane train pulling “different” carriages, like small vats, instead of the usual wire sided containers of cane. Realized they were carrying processed sugar from a mill to the bulk ship-loading facility at Lucinda. We could see raw sugar around the top opening on some of the vats, where it had spilt over in loading.

The front of the sugar train……

We got ahead of the train at one point, so I got the chance to get out of Truck to take some photos. The driver waved and hooted at me – I guess it was some variety in his slow, tootly journey. 

….and the rear

It had already become evident to us, firstly, that there were heaps of cane railway crossings on these district roads, and secondly, that often these did not have a great line of sight. Cane trains travelled fairly slowly, but I wondered how many crossing collisions with cars there were, in an average cane season?

From Halifax, took the Lucinda road, and as we came into that village, turned left to go out to Dungeness to have a look. Here, on a tidal  inlet connected to the Herbert River, there was a large resort-type development, a small number of houses, and a boat launch ramp.

The channel and boat mooring at Dungeness

The channel between Dungeness and Hinchinbrook Island was fairly narrow and the island loomed large across it.

With some cloud down over the mountainous top of Hinchinbrook Island, it looked brooding and mysterious.

Hinchinbrook Island, from Dungeness

Dungeness was an attractive spot – pity it had no caravan or camping facilities.

We walked around the boat ramp area and took photos and just generally admired the place.

Then drove the few kms back to Lucinda. The good-sized caravan park there looked totally full. Lots of boats there too, but the internal roads were a lot wider than at Taylors Beach, so it was not so much of an obstacle course. It was, clearly, also a winter destination for lots of “fishy” people. The blurb in my tourist brochure described it as an oceanfront caravan park, but this ignored the existence of a large park between it and the sea!

Any views of Hinchinbrook Island from Lucinda – which would have been spectacular – were obscured by the 5.6km long sugar loading conveyor pier and the associated train unloading and sugar storage facilities. It was all quite industrial.

Lucinda sugar storage and shipping facility, from fishing jetty

There was no public access along the jetty structure that carried the sugar way out to where the ocean was deep enough for ships to dock. The structure was so long we couldn’t see its end.

The 5.6km long bulk sugar loading jetty

There was a staircase and walkway across the sugar terminal installations, that gave foot access to a landing and fishing jetty beyond. It might have been the village’s main jetty before the sugar facility was built but there was no vehicle access to it now. We did the trek across to the jetty. There were great views from that, of the Island and the opening of the Hinchinbrook Channel.

Opening to the Hinchinbrook Channel

The afternoon light on the water made it very photogenic.

Swimming enclosure, sugar jetty with fishing jetty behind that

There was also a walking path along the Lucinda foreshore, but we didn’t do that.

The Lucinda area and sugar jetty (Google )

Had to drive back to Ingham. I needed to shop for some of the ingredients needed for the pineapple  salad that John fancied for tea – chillies, cashews, fish sauce  and coriander. He also bought a couple of casks of wine.

Decided to go for a walk at the Tyto Wetlands. It was almost 5pm by then, though, so too late to do the full circuit and dawdle to spot birds. We walked to the first viewing point, past some indigenous boys – about 10-12 years old – who were swimming in one of the ponds. They were also using stakes – that had been nearby young tree supports – to dig up mussels and try to “spear” some little wallabies grazing nearby. I could not imagine that the wetlands staff were happy about such activities, but maybe they could not do anything to prevent same.

John was not walking well. Maybe another day we would be able to do more, here.

Refuelled Truck and went back to camp.

It took me until almost 7pm to get the salads made for tea – pineapple and potato ones. Late meal for us. There was a definite smell of cooking fish around the caravan park!

After tea, John spent time on the computer, I read.

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